Grannies Gone Bad: 79-Year-Old Arrested for Burglary, Robbery, and Kidnapping

Forget your stereotypes of the sweet little old ladies making cookies and paying you a shiny new quarter to rake their lawns. Not everyone grows old gracefully, and these Oklahoma grannies are going down kicking and screaming. After a January 18 incident, a judge issued an arrest warrant late last week for 79-year-old Bobbie House, of Oklahoma City. She was arrested and booked into the Oklahoma County Jail on Saturday, where she is held on $50,000 bond on complaints of burglary, kidnapping, and robbery by force or fear. The incident leading to House's arrest came last month when a security guard at Specialty Building Material in southwest Oklahoma City heard noises that sounded like materials being thrown into the bed of a truck. The guard told police that he discovered a man throwing shingles into the bed of a parked pickup truck. He attempted to stop the man and an altercation ensued in the bed of the truck. House, who was in the driver's seat, sped off while the security guard and the suspect identified as Curtis Wacasey, Jr., 43, fought in the truck. Eventually, Wacasey jumped into the driver seat to take over driving for House, and when the truck popped a tire against a curb, the guard was able to escape the truck. Kidnapping is a felony punishable by a maximum of 20 years in prison. Second degree burglary is punishable by two to seven years in prison. First degree robbery is punishable by a minimum or 10 years in prison; additionally, it is an 85 percent crime that necessitates the inmate serve at least 85 percent of his or her sentence prior to parole eligibility. At 79 years old, a conviction of the three felonies of which she is accused could conceivable put House behind bars for the rest of her life. That is a pretty heavy outcome for someone whose prior criminal history, according to an Oklahoma court records search, shows nothing but traffic violations. Sure, we hear of "dirty old men," but crime knows no age limits nor gender limits. Just because your vision of a grandma has her baking cookies and teaching Sunday school does not mean that she isn't instead cooking meth, or smoking a joint in front of a preschooler, or running a drug ring. We are often called to respect our elders and look after seniors. We typically think this means checking on them in bad weather, making sure they are eating well, mowing their lawns, and researching nursing homes when they are no longer able to care for themselves. We do not, in general, think that caring for our elders means hiring a defense lawyer to represent them in a criminal case. But that's what we're here for. Has granny gone bad? Give us a call.  

Comments