Bomb Threat Over Denied Cinnamon Roll Refund Leads to Arrest

People do a lot of stupid things when they are angry, and an overreaction to a minor event can have serious life-altering consequences. Usually, these cases involve road rage, domestic violence, or assault and battery in which one person becomes enraged over a real or perceived slight and lashes out against the person who offended him or her. Often, truth is stranger than fiction in these situations, such as the case of Helen Ann Williams, a 44-year-old woman in South Carolina. Williams sent her husband out for a beer run last Christmas Eve; however, he soon discovered that the stores had already closed for the holiday. Williams was so enraged that her husband came home empty-handed and beer-less that she stabbed him with a ceramic squirrel. Williams was charged with "domestic violence of a high and aggravated nature," all because the stores close early on Christmas Eve, and her husband couldn't bring her the beer she wanted. It's a lesson in overreaction that one Oklahoma City man should have taken to heart. Brian Griffin, 65, bought some cinnamon rolls from an area Buy 4 Less store. Apparently, the bakery treats were not everything he dreamed they would be, and around midnight Monday, Griffin attempted to return the cinnamon rolls for a refund. When the manager refused to issue a refund for the unsatisfactory rolls, Griffin allegedly became belligerent and "caused a scene" before leaving the store. Later, Oklahoma City police received a phone call from a man who claimed that he had recently been discharged from the military and that he placed two bombs at the Buy 4 Less on N. Pennsylvania Avenue. A search for explosives turned up nothing, but the night manager informed police of the earlier incident with Griffin. The manager gave the officers Griffin's number, which matched the number from which the bomb threat was received. Griffin was arrested and booked into the Oklahoma County Jail, where he was held on $10,000. An Oklahoma County Jail inmate search shows that Griffin is no longer in custody. Making a bomb threat may seem like a harmless prank, but it is a felony that carries significant prison time upon conviction. Under 21 O.S. 1761.1, it is a felony to "[m]ake any threat or convey information known to be false, concerning an attempt or alleged attempt to kill, injure or intimidate any person or unlawfully damage any real or personal property by means of an explosive, incendiary device, or simulated bomb." Making a bomb threat carries a potential prison term of 3 to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. It seems a pretty hefty price to pay for stale cinnamon rolls.

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