OKC Man Guilty in Wife's Murder

An Oklahoma City man who claimed to have accidentally shot his sleeping wife while fighting off an intruder has been found guilty of her murder.  
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Oklahoma Inmates Serving Life for Drugs Hope for Commutation

Oklahoma's drug laws are tough--among the toughest in the nation. And although the federal government called stringent drug penalties "draconian" and backed away from them in recent years, Oklahoma has been slower to move in reducing drug sentences that are typically overkill. 
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Driver Pleads in OSU Homecoming Crash Case

The murder and assault trial of Adacia Avery Chambers, the driver who plowed her car into spectators at the OSU homecoming parade, was expected to begin on Tuesday of this week. Instead, the case was resolved prior to trial when the young woman entered a plea of no contest to the charges against her.  
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City Becomes First in Nation to Add Behavioral Health Center to Jail

We have written extensively about the intersection of criminal justice and mental health, and how when the two collide, often the results are poor for everyone involved. Many times, those arrested for misdemeanor offenses are not "criminals" in the traditional sense, but they are suffering from mental illness, and treatment would be infinitely more productive than incarceration. 
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Jury to Determine Competency of Moore Beheading Suspect

On September 24, 2014, recently fired Vaughan Foods employee Alton Alexander Nolen left the facility, grabbed a large knife from his vehicle, and returned to the building, savagely attacking two former co-workers. Before Vaughan Foods Chief Operating Officer Mark Vaughan, a reserve Oklahoma County Sheriff's deputy, shot Nolen and ended the attack, the man had beheaded one woman, Colleen Hufford, and attempted to behead another, Traci Johnson. Johnson was critically injured in the attack, but she survived. 
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Can Police Search without a Warrant?

One of the first rules of criminal defense a lawyer will tell you is to never, ever talk to police (or anyone else, for that matter) about your case without the presence and advice of your attorney. Another cardinal rule is never consent to a search without a warrant, although you could even take that a step further and say, "Never consent to a search." After all, if police have a warrant, then they do not need your consent. You cannot interfere, but you do not have to give your permission, either. 
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