The Law Firm of Oklahoma Criminal Defense Attorney Dustin Phillips

(405) 418-8888

   (405) 418-8888
 
Photo credit: katsrcool - Automobile Alley in Oklahoma City

RECENT CASE RESULTS

Dismissed
Lewd Acts with a Minor Child under 16 (3 counts), Lewd Molestation, Engaging in a Pattern of Criminal Behavior, Threatening an Act of Violence
November 2016 | Cleveland County Court
Dismissed
False Declaration to a Pawn Broker
October 2016 | Oklahoma County Court
Dismissed
Robbery with a Firearm (2 counts), False Personation
October 2016 | Oklahoma County Court
Dismissed
Child Neglect (3 counts)
October 2016 | Texas County Court
Dismissed
Domestic Abuse Assault & Battery, Malicious Destruction of Property
October 2016 | Oklahoma County Court
Dismissed
Obtaining CDS by Forged or Altered Prescription (6 counts)
October 2016 | Oklahoma County Court
Dismissed
Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of a Firearm in the Commission of a Felony, Possession of a Firearm After Former Conviction of a Felony
September 2016 | Carter County Court
Dismissed
Pointing a Firearm, Malicious Destruction of Property
September 2016 | Oklahoma County Court
Dismissed
Victim's Protective Order
August 2016 | Oklahoma County Court
Dismissed
Burglary in the 1st Degree, Kidnapping
August 2016 | Oklahoma County Court
 

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Trusted Oklahoma Attorneys

When you are undertaking a significant legal battle, you need and deserve a competent, knowledgeable and dedicated lawyer in your corner, fighting for your rights. The criminal defense lawyers at Phillips & Associates have earned a reputation for success through skillful and aggressive defense representation. 

We represent clients who have been accused of serious felonies, including sex crimes, white-collar crimes and even murder, as well as those charged with minor crimes such as DUI or simple marijuana possession. You are likely visiting our website because circumstances have placed you or someone you love in a predicament that you never imagined or anticipated.

For a free, confidential evaluation of your case, call (405) 418-8888 or submit our online Case Review Form

Charged with a Crime?

If you've been charged with a crime anywhere in Oklahoma, your next actions greatly affect the success of your defense.

Get the information you need to take the correct next steps, and then let our team of criminal defense attorneys rigorously defend your case.

First Time OffenseWhat to do if I'm arrested.

Oklahoma City Defense Lawyers

We at Phillips & Associates understand that facing a criminal charge, whether a misdemeanor or felony, is a stressful and inconvenient ordeal. Do you know your rights and privileges? Is your reputation at stake? Either way, a strong defense is the best way for you to protect yourself against criminal charges. The criminal defense attorneys at Phillips & Associates are dedicated to upholding defendants' rights and protecting them from unnecessary conviction and the consequences thereof. Our law firm handles both misdemeanor and felony cases in city, county and state courts throughout Oklahoma, as well as provide federal court defense. Whether you are facing a year in jail or a lifetime in prison, we will provide the aggressive defense representation you need to realize a successful outcome to your case.

Where Do You Find a Lawyer?

There are certainly plenty of places to find a lawyer. The challenge is not so much as to where to find a lawyer, but where to find one you can trust. The attorneys at Phillips & Associates have a proven track record and will be up front with you about your case, and then continue to work with you personally to resolve your case.

The Offices of Phillips & Associates are located near the heart of Oklahoma City, at Penn Ave. and NW Expressway, next to 50 Penn Place and across from Penn Square Mall.


Criminal Law in Oklahoma

The state statutes enumerate crimes and their associated punishments under Title 21, the penal code of Oklahoma. According to section 3 of the criminal code, a crime is defined as "any act or omission prohibited by the law which, upon conviction, is punishable by fine, imprisonment, removal from office, disqualification to hold office, or death."

State crimes are divided into two main classifications: misdemeanors and felonies. The Oklahoma penal code states that "A felony is a crime which is, or may be, punishable with death, or by imprisonment in the penitentiary" and defines all other crimes as misdemeanors. Generally, misdemeanor crimes are those punishable by a maximum sentence of one year in county jail and felony offenses are those punishable by a year or more in a state or federal prison.

Many crimes may be charged as either misdemeanors or felonies according to certain conditions of the offense, including degree of severity, repeat offenses and use of weapons. For example, domestic abuse and DUI are generally charged as misdemeanors on the first offense, but subsequent offenses are charged as felonies. Theft is a misdemeanor when the value of stolen property is $500 or less, but it is a felony if the value exceeds $500. A skillful defense lawyer may, in certain situations, be able to have a felony charge reduced to a misdemeanor, minimizing the potential penalties associated with a possible conviction.

Felony crimes are considered to be more serious offenses than misdemeanors. Felonies include violent crimes, sex crimes, crimes against children, high-dollar property crimes and drug crimes beyond simple possession. Anyone convicted of a felony suffers restriction or revocation of certain rights, even after a prison sentence has been served. A felony conviction can impact your voting rights, jury service, gun ownership and professional licensing.

At Phillips & Associates, we are committed to providing exceptional legal services to every client, whether he or she is facing the prospect of probation and driver's license suspension or the possibility of life in prison. We understand that, regardless of the legal battle you face, the consequences of conviction can disrupt or destroy the life you had planned for yourself. Because of this, we handle each case with care, exploring all possible options for your defense and using innovative and proven courtroom strategies to win your case. Though no attorney can ethically guarantee a dismissal or acquittal, the record of success at Phillips & Associates demonstrates our dedication to achieving positive results for our clients in Oklahoma City and across the state.

Not every case can be dismissed and not every trial ends in acquittal. If a criminal charge leads to a deferred sentence or conviction, all is not lost. Through the process of expungement, individuals convicted of certain misdemeanors and nonviolent felonies may be able to clear their criminal record. If someone is found guilty of a crime, the accused defendant may be able to appeal the conviction or sentence. Our expungement attorneys and appellate lawyers have helped many Oklahomans clear their names and get their lives back on track. A foolish mistake, an unfair trial or a wrongful conviction should not destroy anyone's life. If you are plagued by a criminal record or need to appeal a conviction, contact our law firm to explore your options for relief.

 
 
 

LATEST NEWS

 
  • Nov 28, 2016

    Jury to Determine Competency of Moore Beheading Suspect

    On September 24, 2014, recently fired Vaughan Foods employee Alton Alexander Nolen left the facility, grabbed a large knife from his vehicle, and returned to the building, savagely attacking two former co-workers. Before Vaughan Foods Chief Operating Officer Mark Vaughan, a reserve Oklahoma County Sheriff's deputy, shot Nolen and ended the attack, the man had beheaded one woman, Colleen Hufford, and attempted to behead another, Traci Johnson. Johnson was critically injured in the attack, but she survived. 

    Read More
  • Nov 21, 2016

    Oklahoma Jails Increasingly Used as Mental Health Facilities

    This blog published a series of articles called "Where Mental Health and Criminal Justice Collide," which explored the costs--both human and economic costs--associated with allowing our jails to become de facto mental health hospitals. We've frequently discussed the problems faced by continually cutting mental health and substance abuse funding, and instead relying on the police to be first responders in dealing with mental health crises. Yet since we first began discussing this issue on our blog, little has changed. In fact, a new law intended to reduce the prison population by making certain drug possession and property crimes misdemeanors could actually exacerbate the problems found at county jails. 

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  • Nov 14, 2016

    13-Year-Old Arrested in Shooting Death of Friend's Brother

    A 13-year-old boy who was playing with a revolver has been arrested after the gun discharged and killed his friend's older brother. 

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  • Nov 10, 2016

    Oklahoma Voters Prefer Rehabilitation to Long Prison Sentences

    Oklahoma has one of the highest incarceration rates in the nation, and it locks up more women than any other state. This is largely due to tough anti-drug laws which send people to prison for relatively minor crimes. 

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  • Nov 07, 2016

    State Superintendent Accused of Felony Campaign Violations

    Oklahoma Department of Education superintendent Joy Hofmeister turned herself in to authorities and was released on $8,000 bond after being accused of accepting illegal donations during her 2014 campaign against incumbent Janet Barresi.  

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  • Nov 03, 2016

    Three Arrested for Aiding Fugitive Michael Vance

    The death of Michael Dale Vance, Jr., in a hailstorm of state trooper bullets put an end to the nearly week-long manhunt spurred by the shooting of two Wellston police officers and the murder of a Luther couple. However, the case is far from closed, as law enforcement officers recognized that Vance, who had been injured in the Wellston shootout, must have received help from someone along the way. 

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  • Oct 31, 2016

    Murder Fugitive Michael Vance Dead after Butler Shootout

    For nearly a week after Michael Vance shot two Wellston police officers, murdered two relatives, and committed one car jacking and attempted another, law enforcement agencies across Oklahoma conducted an extensive manhunt for the murder suspect, activating the state's first "Blue Alert" to help apprehend suspects in police shootings.
     

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  • Oct 17, 2016

    Oklahoma City Police Officer Arrested on Prostitution Complaints

    An Oklahoma City police lieutenant was arrested last week after evidence in an unrelated case indicated that he was involved in criminal activity. 

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  • Oct 13, 2016

    Love County Sheriff Resigns Amid Corruption Charges

    A longtime Love County Sheriff accused of corruption and willful neglect of duty has resigned from office some three months after his arrest on corruption charges. 

    Read More
  • Oct 10, 2016

    Appeals Court Rejects Second Appeal of Twice-Convicted Murderer

    On May 19, 2009, Antwun "Speedy" Parker, 16, and Jevontai Ingram, 14, donned ski masks and walked into the Reliable Discount Pharmacy with the intent to rob the place. Ingram was armed, Parker was not. The two teens did not count on pharmacist Jerome Ersland also being armed, and the altercation ended with Ersland shooting and killing Parker as Ingram fled. 

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  • Oct 03, 2016

    Non-custodial mother turns self in after abducting 8-year-old girl

    A Pauls Valley 8-year-old girl was found safe in Illinois after her mother turned herself in to authorities.  

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  • Sep 26, 2016

    Oklahoma law enforcement takes steps to reduce unnecessary police shootings

    The fatal shooting of Terrence Crutcher, an unarmed man, by a Tulsa police officer was just the latest of the many fatal police-involved shootings in Oklahoma, the state that leads the nation in fatal police shootings, according to a Washington Post analysis. Last year, 32 people were killed by law enforcement officers in Oklahoma. Most of those were armed with a deadly weapon; two were allegedly using their vehicles as weapons—but one was armed only with a toy gun. Four more were unarmed.  

    Read More