Voraxapar Gives Disappointing Results in Merck Trials

Oklahoma City pharmaceutical litigation attorneys monitor developments in the release of new drugs, knowing that many of these drugs are granted FDA approval only to have their adverse affects discovered after being used on a wide population.  Two common side effects of dangerous or defective drugs are increased risk of heart attack or stroke.  Now, clinical trials for a drug being studied to prevent those two potentially fatal conditions has yielded disappointing results for major drug manufacturer Merck & Co. Voraxapar is being studied as a blood thinner aimed at preventing heart attack and stroke in patients who were at risk due to hardening of the arteries or a previous heart attack or stroke.  The experimental drug was given to half of the 26,000 participants in the trial, and while the drug showed a slight decrease in repeat heart attack or stroke, it showed a marked increase in heavy bleeding. Of the patients who were given voraxapar, nine percent died of heart attack or stroke within three years of taking the drug; of those who were not given voraxapar, more than ten percent died of heart attack or stroke.  This slight benefit may be outweighed by the drug's adverse effects:  more than four percent of those taking voraxapar suffered moderate to severe bleeding, including dangerous bleeding in the head.  Only two percent of those patients not given voraxapar suffered such bleeding. The lack of promising results led a physician with Cedars-Sinai Medical Center to say, "This is not a drug that I would put in my personal medicine chest." When the risks of taking a drug or medication outweigh the potential benefits, that drug may be labeled as a "dangerous drug" or a "defective drug."  While defective drugs are generally pulled from the marketplace, dangerous drugs often remain available for patient use--they are simply given stricter warning labels.  Unfortunately, many patients do not understand the associated risks of a drug, and a defective drug is not identified as such until its ill effects are demonstrated on the general public. Merck & Co. may be extra cautious in releasing this drug after being embroiled in pharmaceutical litigation and class action lawsuits pertaining to the company's drug Vioxx.  Oklahoma dangerous drugs lawyers and attorneys across the nation have represented patients taking Vioxx and their families in personal injury, class action, and wrongful death suits after the drug's dangerous effects became known. Some experts contend that Vioxx should have been recalled as early as 2000, and others say that documents indicate that Merck knew of the risks associated with the drug.  Vioxx, intended to treat arthritis, carried such adverse side effects as increased risk of blood clots, heart attack, and stroke.  In fact, research shows that patients who took Vioxx to treat their arthritis were up to three times more likely to suffer heart attack or sudden cardiac death than those not taking painkillers. When the drugs intended to heal you cause more harm than good, an Oklahoma City pharmaceutical litigation lawyer can handle your dangerous drugs case.  Whether you are seeking financial compensation for your medical expenses or for a loved one's burial expenses, we can help you get the compensation you need for the fullest possible physical, emotional, and financial recovery following harmful side effects of a defective or dangerous drug.

Comments