Dangerous Jobs and Workplace Accidents

A recent Bankrate.com article featured on Yahoo! illustrated the ten most dangerous jobs, calling the results "surprising."  Law enforcement officers ranked tenth on the list, and apparently, many people were shocked that the occupation did not rank higher on the list.  Oklahoma accident attorneys who have worked with people injured in oil field accidents and construction site accidents, however, understand that working around dangerous equipment and heavy machinery is often more deadly than working with firearms.  It is important that employers in risky professions take adequate steps to ensure the safety of their employees.  Workplace accidents can lead to Workers Compensation Claims, and in the case of employer negligence, can lead to a personal injury or wrongful death lawsuit.  According to the article "The 10 Most Dangerous Jobs in the U.S." by Travers Korch, the Bureau of Labor Statistics' most recent statistics report 4,547 occupational fatalities in 2010.  The article lists the ten deadliest jobs as:

  • Fishermen - 116 deaths per 100,000 workers (29 deaths in 2010); Fishing has held the distinction as the deadliest job since 1992
  • Loggers- 91.9 deaths per 100,000 workers (59 deaths in 2010)
  • Aircraft pilots and flight engineers - 70.6 deaths per 100,000 workers (78 deaths in 2010)
  • Farmers and ranchers - 41.4 deaths per 100,000 workers (300 deaths in 2010)
  • Miners (including Oil Rig workers)  - 39 deaths per 100,000 workers (172 deaths in 2010)
  • Roofers - 32.4 deaths per 100,000 workers (57 deaths in 2010)
  • Sanitation Workers - 29.8 deaths per 100,000 workers (26 deaths in 2010)
  • Truck Drivers -  21.8 deaths per 100,000 workers (683 deaths in 2010)
  • Stuntmen - 2.5 deaths per 1,000 workers
  • Law Enforcement Officers - 18 deaths per 100,000 workers (133 deaths in 2010)
With more than 4,500 workplace fatalities, it seems odd that 2010 was considered a "safe" year.  However, certain jobs carry inherent dangers that make workers more susceptible to workplace injuries.  Among the deadliest workplace hazards are heavy machinery and equipment, falls, and transportation accidents.  Oklahomans in particular are aware of the dangerous nature of jobs such as farming and ranching, roofing, and oil field work.  Job site accidents can cause catastrophic injury or even death.  For those affected by a devastating workplace accident, help may be available through an Oklahoma Workers Compensation lawyer or an accident attorney in Oklahoma. Whether you are considering a personal injury lawsuit to help you recover from a job site accident or whether you are seeking a wrongful death lawsuit following a loved one's death at work, our attorneys  can help.

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