Cat, Baby Test Positive for Meth in Separate Oklahoma Drug Cases

Like many states, Oklahoma has a significant meth problem.  Nationally, meth lab seizures have increased 577% since 1995, and the DEA reports that the "drug of choice" in Oklahoma is methamphetamine.  Last year, a Tulsa reporter claimed that police across the nation have dubbed Tulsa "The Meth Capital of the U.S."   Oklahoma drug lawyers understand the toll meth use and abuse can have on everyone involved, including not only the meth manufacturers, dealers, and addicts, but also the innocent victims of this incipient drug:  from taxpayers, law enforcement agencies, and fire departments to neighbors of meth houses and children and animals who live under dangerous conditions surrounded by meth labs. In separate incidents recently, both a cat and an infant tested positive for meth near Tulsa.  The cat was found at a Catoosa home that was raided in a drug bust on April 15.  The raid revealed multiple one-pot meth labs (a common method for manufacturing meth in Oklahoma).  Though several cats were in the home, the one in the worst condition was taken from the home to be treated at a local veterinarian's office.  The cat, who was extremely malnourished and neglected, tested positive for meth.  The veterinarian said that although it did not appear that the cat had ingested the drug, the chemicals were found in its blood stream from living in the environment containing at least thirty one-pot meth labs. On April 24, police arrested a Skiatook woman  after her 8-month-old daughter tested positive for meth at St. Francis Hospital in Tulsa.  According to police, Amy Lynn Daugherty, 25, sought the advice of a family friend with medical training when she found her infant daughter limp and unresponsive.  Emergency personnel transported the infant and her mother to the Tulsa hospital, where the baby tested positive for high levels of meth.  Daugherty told police that a few days before, she and her daughter  had been present in a home where meth and marijuana were being used.  She reportedly told authorities that her daughter had never been out of her supervision and that she did not know how it was possible that the baby had ingested methamphetamine.  Daugherty was arrested on a complaint of child neglect, with bail set at $25,000.  The injured infant, her twin sister, and a 5-year-old brother were taken in to protective custody by DHS. The manufacture of methamphetamine is relatively cheap and easy; however, meth labs are fraught with inherent dangers from burns, explosions, and accidental ingestion.  Because of the dangers of meth and the high cost of addiction, meth manufacturing, distribution, and possession are prosecuted vigorously.  If you or someone you love has been accused of a meth offense, contact an experienced Oklahoma drug defense attorney today.

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